Publications of F. Celada

This page shows all publications that appeared in the IASI annual research reports. Authors currently affiliated with the Institute are always listed with the full name.

You can browse through them using either the links of the following line or those associated with author names.

Show all publications of the year  1988, with author Celada F., in the category IASI Research Reports (or show them all):


IASI Research Report n. 241  


Gorog G., Gandolfi A., Paradisi G., Rolleri E., Klasen E., Dessì V., Strom R., Celada F.

Use of bispecific hybrid monoclonal antibodies for the development of a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay.

ABSTRACT
Hybrid bispecific monoclonal antibodies reacting with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and with the E. coli enzyme B-galactosidase (GZ) were produced by fusion of hybridomas or chemical linkage of half-antibodies. Since the original anti-GZ antibody used in these experiments was capable of protecting GZ from thermal denaturation, it was possible, by hybridizing it with two different non-competitive anti-CEA antibodies, to design a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for quantitation of CEA. In fact a mathematical analysis of the reaction indicates that, under appropriate concentrations of the reactants, circular complexes can be formed, which contain the two hybrid antibodies, the GZ enzyme and the CEA antigen. The stability of these complexes can be expected to be substantially greater than that of the more labile CEA-free GZ-antibody complexes, prompting a significant increase in the amount of enzyme molecules which are bound to antibody and are consequently protected from thermal denaturation. These expectations were supported by experimental results, heat-resistant enzyme activity being indeed, under appropriated conditions, proportional to concentration of CEA in the range up to 75 ng/ml. As predicted by theory, however, in the presence of excess of CEA - in fact at CEA concentrations which are higher than those of possible clinical relevance - circular complexes tend to open up, leading to a marked prozone effect.
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